Teacher Tips for How to Deal with a Loud Classroom

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Hello??? Can anybody hear me? Is your classroom super loud? Are you overstimulated by the end of the day? You aren’t alone. In an early childhood classroom, noise is typical but how do you know if it is “productive” noise or “too much” noise? I’m here to help with some teacher tips for how to deal with a loud classroom when the noise has become disruptive instead of productive!

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Check out these teacher tips for how to deal with a loud classroom when the noise has become disruptive instead of productive!

Teacher Tips for How to Deal with a Loud Classroom

I’m a reformed “quiet classroom all the time” teacher. I hated noise. Can you relate? When it was noisy, I would cringe. I thought noise meant the classroom wasn’t being managed well by ME. Ridiculous, I know, but it’s the truth and I know I’m not alone in that way of thinking.

Now I am trying to view noise differently. When students are being loud, instead of immediately making the noise stop, I pause and look around and ask myself the following questions, “Is it just bothering ME or is it really causing a problem?” “Are the students being productive or are they off task?”

Typically you will get your answer by observing. If you see students not engaged or not using materials appropriately, it’s probably time to regroup. On the other hand, if students are engaged and working hard, it may be okay to let the noise go.

Play dough and other hands-on activities can sometimes lead to extra chatting and noise.

It’s important that our students work together and communicate with each other. Noise is a part of this. This noise is productive! 

However, if the noise is bothering you to where it impacts your engagement or small groups with students, OF COURSE, it’s a good idea to regroup or practice noise expectations. But before you do, try pausing and observing so you can decide if it’s truly needed.

Students working together in centers can lead to productive noise and that is great.

It’s also important to consider the type of classroom you have and your student makeup. Some students may be sensitive to noise. If this is your classroom, make sure to have some sound-canceling headphones or a quiet area for these students to go to.

Teaching students coping strategies is important. They won’t always be able to avoid noise so teaching them how to manage these situations is an important life skill.

It's important to have a quiet place for students to go to if they  need to.

Just remember, noise is NORMAL in an early childhood classroom. And hopefully, these tips will help you decide when to jump in to regroup or when to step back and embrace the noise!

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The Kindergarten Connection
Teacher Tips for How to Deal with a Loud Classroom
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